Steps And Tips You Should Know!

Hi! good morning, today we will made an article about Steps And Tips You Should Know!

The vehicle’s alternator supplies power to recharge the battery and run its electronics. On several occasions you should know how to change an alternatorand thus get rid of the complications that a bad alternator can give you.

If your vehicle begins to show signs of power reduction, such as dimming headlights or interior lighting, you can have your alternator tested for free at most auto parts stores.

How to change an alternator

Generally, if your alternator can’t produce enough current to keep the battery charged and the car running, you’ll need to replace it. The steps to change an alternator correctly are as follows:

A car alternator
A car alternator

1- Disconnection of the alternator

Obviously to carry out the proper change of the alternator it is necessary that you proceed to remove it also correctly. Do not forget to be sure that the alternator needs to be replaced to remove it.

Park the car on a flat, level surface.

Any time you plan to work on your vehicle, safety is paramount. Since you may have to jack up the vehicle, make sure it is parked on a surface that is suitable for the job. It should be evenly paved and flat.

  • Even if you don’t have the car jack up, it’s easier to work on a flat surface.
  • Make sure the vehicle is parked or has the parking brake on (if equipped with a standard transmission).

Disconnect the battery

Find the correct socket to loosen the bolt that holds the cable on the negative terminal tight. It is the battery terminal with a visible sign (-). Once it’s loose, slide the cable out of the terminal to disconnect the battery.

Never work in the engine compartment of a vehicle without first disconnecting the battery for safety.

  • Working on the alternator without disconnecting the battery could cause electrical shock or damage to the vehicle.
  • You can leave the positive cable connected.

Anchor the vehicle if necessary

Follow the accessory or serpentine belts to locate the alternator in the engine compartment. Depending on the vehicle, it may be at the top closest to you, or it may be on the side and difficult to access.

If you can’t easily access it from the engine compartment, you’ll need to jack up the vehicle.

  • Make sure the parking brake is on and the wheels are chocked before raising.
  • Insert the support jack under the vehicle for added safety once it is raised.

Disconnect the main power cable from the alternator.

The main power cable will be the thick cable connected to the alternator coming out of the battery. Depending on how much space you have in your specific vehicle, you may be able to use a ratchet, but in some cases, you may only be able to install an open-end wrench. Unscrew the bolt that holds it in place and pull it out from where it is attached.

  • Bolts will likely require standard size sockets or lug wrenches on American made vehicles, and metric on most foreign applications.
  • The only other wire going to the alternator plugs into a harness so it will be easy to identify.
  • Store the bolt in a safe place until it is time to install new alternator.

Release the safety clip that connects the cable set

The only other wiring that goes to the alternator is the control harness. Use your finger or a flathead screwdriver to release the clip that holds the harness in place, then slide it apart.

  • Be careful if you use a screwdriver to get to hard-to-reach clips so you don’t break the plastic.
  • Tuck the loose cable to the side so it doesn’t catch on the alternator when you remove it.

2- Remove the old alternator

Removing the old or faulty alternator is a bit of a technical process, you just have to follow the proper steps to achieve it without damaging anything.

Relieve belt tension with automatic tensioner (if equipped)

Some vehicles use the alternator itself to apply tension to the serpentine or accessory belt, but others use an automatic tensioner pulley. Take care to insert the square of the cutter bar into the hole of the automatic tensioner pulley and press clockwise to relieve the tension on the belt.

  • You can tell if your vehicle uses an automatic tensioner by looking at the alternator mounting bracket: if the bolts can slide back and forth on the bracket, you don’t have an automatic tensioner.
  • You will need to slide the belt off the alternator pulley before releasing the auto tensioner.
  • In some cars, you may need a friend to relieve tension while you unbuckle.

Loosen the alternator bolts if there is no automatic tensioner

On cars without an automatic tensioner pulley, you can relieve the tension on the belt simply by loosening the two bolts that hold the alternator to the engine. These will often require a 14mm or 1/2 inch socket, although you may need to try others.

  • As you loosen the bolts, the alternator slides on the bracket under the tension of the belt.
  • It may not be necessary to remove the strap or belt if it is not damaged.

Inspects the alternator belt for damage

Look for signs of glitter or polish (shinier portions) on the edges and bottom of the band. Inspect both the top and bottom for signs of cracking as well.

  • If you encounter any of these problems, you will need to replace the belt.

Remove the alternator from the engine compartment

Regarding how to remove the alternator from a car, you should know that with the belt removed from the alternator pulley and the cables disconnected, the alternator should come out freely.

  • You may have to move the alternator around a few things in order to remove it.
  • Keep a record of how to remove the alternator from the engine compartment to help you hook up the new one.

Compare the new alternator to the old one.

Before you know how to change an alternator, place it on a table next to the old one you just removed. Make sure that the mounting holes and cable connectors are in the same place and that the two parts are the same size.

  • Even if you provided specific information when purchasing the alternator, this step is important to ensure you were provided with the correct part.
  • If they do not match, return the new alternator to the auto parts store for the correct replacement.

3- Installation of the new alternator

Well, regarding how to put a new alternator, it is necessary to remember how the vehicle looked before with the alternator in place; we don’t want the puzzle to look bad.

Slide the new alternator into its respective place

You may have to move the alternator to get it back in place in an engine bay full of accessories. Make sure to hold any loose wires or strap out of the way as you put them in place.

  • Be careful not to catch any wiring behind the alternator as you slide it into place.
  • Also watch out for the serpentine belt when you slide the alternator into place to make sure you don’t damage it.

Insert the mounting bolts

Slide the mounting bolts through the alternator and into the mounting bracket. Hand tighten them until they are comfortable. On cars with automatic tensioner pulleys, you can fully tighten the bolts at this point, otherwise keep the bolts loose.

  • You will need to tension the belt using the alternator later if you don’t have an automatic tensioner.
  • Make sure the bolts are tight enough to hold the alternator in place, but loose enough to slide from side to side on the bracket.

Run the belt over the new alternator pulley.

Install the new belt or put the old belt back through all the appropriate pulleys. If you’re not sure how to route the belt correctly, look for a diagram on the car body inside the engine compartment for guidance.

The strap will have to go around any specific accessories that it is supposed to power on your vehicle.

  • If there isn’t a diagram stuck in the engine bay, you might as well be able to find it in the vehicle’s owner’s manual.
  • You can also find the diagram on the manufacturer’s website.

Apply tension to the alternator with a lever if necessary

If your vehicle does not have an automatic tensioner pulley, apply pressure to the alternator with a large screwdriver or pry bar until the belt is tight. Place the lever between the alternator and the engine and push the alternator out, away from the engine.

  • Be careful not to pinch or cut any wires with the screwdriver or pry bar.
  • You or a friend will have to keep pressing until the bolts are tight.

Tighten the screws and the strap

With tension on the belt applied through the alternator and pry bar, use the appropriate socket and ratchet to tighten the two mounting bolts the rest of the way. This will allow the alternator to maintain tension on the belt.

Make sure the belt has less than an inch of play back and forth once installed.

If the belt is a little loose, loosen the bolts and apply pressure again using the bar while tightening them.

Connect the power cable and monitor harness

Reconnect the wire harness and insert the bolt that secures the main power cable to the alternator in the same order that you removed it. They must be installed exactly the same as on the old alternator.

  • Make sure the main power cable is tight on the new alternator.
  • Listen for an audible “click” from the wiring harness to confirm that it is tight.

Reconnect the battery

Now that you know how to change an alternator, what you are left with is just making a few adjustments. With the new alternator in place, all that’s left for you to do is reconnect the negative cable to the battery. Making sure to tighten it down firmly so it doesn’t loosen as you drive.

  • If the battery is dead, you may need to replace or charge it.
  • If the vehicle is raised, remove the jack and lower it.

You can also read: How Do You Know If An Alternator Is Going Bad?

The vehicle’s alternator supplies power to recharge the battery and run its electronics. On several occasions you should know how to change an alternatorand thus get rid of the complications that a bad alternator can give you.

If your vehicle begins to show signs of power reduction, such as dimming headlights or interior lighting, you can have your alternator tested for free at most auto parts stores.

How to change an alternator

Generally, if your alternator can’t produce enough current to keep the battery charged and the car running, you’ll need to replace it. The steps to change an alternator correctly are as follows:

A car alternator
A car alternator

1- Disconnection of the alternator

Obviously to carry out the proper change of the alternator it is necessary that you proceed to remove it also correctly. Do not forget to be sure that the alternator needs to be replaced to remove it.

Park the car on a flat, level surface.

Any time you plan to work on your vehicle, safety is paramount. Since you may have to jack up the vehicle, make sure it is parked on a surface that is suitable for the job. It should be evenly paved and flat.

  • Even if you don’t have the car jack up, it’s easier to work on a flat surface.
  • Make sure the vehicle is parked or has the parking brake on (if equipped with a standard transmission).

Disconnect the battery

Find the correct socket to loosen the bolt that holds the cable on the negative terminal tight. It is the battery terminal with a visible sign (-). Once it’s loose, slide the cable out of the terminal to disconnect the battery.

Never work in the engine compartment of a vehicle without first disconnecting the battery for safety.

  • Working on the alternator without disconnecting the battery could cause electrical shock or damage to the vehicle.
  • You can leave the positive cable connected.

Anchor the vehicle if necessary

Follow the accessory or serpentine belts to locate the alternator in the engine compartment. Depending on the vehicle, it may be at the top closest to you, or it may be on the side and difficult to access.

If you can’t easily access it from the engine compartment, you’ll need to jack up the vehicle.

  • Make sure the parking brake is on and the wheels are chocked before raising.
  • Insert the support jack under the vehicle for added safety once it is raised.

Disconnect the main power cable from the alternator.

The main power cable will be the thick cable connected to the alternator coming out of the battery. Depending on how much space you have in your specific vehicle, you may be able to use a ratchet, but in some cases, you may only be able to install an open-end wrench. Unscrew the bolt that holds it in place and pull it out from where it is attached.

  • Bolts will likely require standard size sockets or lug wrenches on American made vehicles, and metric on most foreign applications.
  • The only other wire going to the alternator plugs into a harness so it will be easy to identify.
  • Store the bolt in a safe place until it is time to install new alternator.

Release the safety clip that connects the cable set

The only other wiring that goes to the alternator is the control harness. Use your finger or a flathead screwdriver to release the clip that holds the harness in place, then slide it apart.

  • Be careful if you use a screwdriver to get to hard-to-reach clips so you don’t break the plastic.
  • Tuck the loose cable to the side so it doesn’t catch on the alternator when you remove it.

2- Remove the old alternator

Removing the old or faulty alternator is a bit of a technical process, you just have to follow the proper steps to achieve it without damaging anything.

Relieve belt tension with automatic tensioner (if equipped)

Some vehicles use the alternator itself to apply tension to the serpentine or accessory belt, but others use an automatic tensioner pulley. Take care to insert the square of the cutter bar into the hole of the automatic tensioner pulley and press clockwise to relieve the tension on the belt.

  • You can tell if your vehicle uses an automatic tensioner by looking at the alternator mounting bracket: if the bolts can slide back and forth on the bracket, you don’t have an automatic tensioner.
  • You will need to slide the belt off the alternator pulley before releasing the auto tensioner.
  • In some cars, you may need a friend to relieve tension while you unbuckle.

Loosen the alternator bolts if there is no automatic tensioner

On cars without an automatic tensioner pulley, you can relieve the tension on the belt simply by loosening the two bolts that hold the alternator to the engine. These will often require a 14mm or 1/2 inch socket, although you may need to try others.

  • As you loosen the bolts, the alternator slides on the bracket under the tension of the belt.
  • It may not be necessary to remove the strap or belt if it is not damaged.

Inspects the alternator belt for damage

Look for signs of glitter or polish (shinier portions) on the edges and bottom of the band. Inspect both the top and bottom for signs of cracking as well.

  • If you encounter any of these problems, you will need to replace the belt.

Remove the alternator from the engine compartment

Regarding how to remove the alternator from a car, you should know that with the belt removed from the alternator pulley and the cables disconnected, the alternator should come out freely.

  • You may have to move the alternator around a few things in order to remove it.
  • Keep a record of how to remove the alternator from the engine compartment to help you hook up the new one.

Compare the new alternator to the old one.

Before you know how to change an alternator, place it on a table next to the old one you just removed. Make sure that the mounting holes and cable connectors are in the same place and that the two parts are the same size.

  • Even if you provided specific information when purchasing the alternator, this step is important to ensure you were provided with the correct part.
  • If they do not match, return the new alternator to the auto parts store for the correct replacement.

3- Installation of the new alternator

Well, regarding how to put a new alternator, it is necessary to remember how the vehicle looked before with the alternator in place; we don’t want the puzzle to look bad.

Slide the new alternator into its respective place

You may have to move the alternator to get it back in place in an engine bay full of accessories. Make sure to hold any loose wires or strap out of the way as you put them in place.

  • Be careful not to catch any wiring behind the alternator as you slide it into place.
  • Also watch out for the serpentine belt when you slide the alternator into place to make sure you don’t damage it.

Insert the mounting bolts

Slide the mounting bolts through the alternator and into the mounting bracket. Hand tighten them until they are comfortable. On cars with automatic tensioner pulleys, you can fully tighten the bolts at this point, otherwise keep the bolts loose.

  • You will need to tension the belt using the alternator later if you don’t have an automatic tensioner.
  • Make sure the bolts are tight enough to hold the alternator in place, but loose enough to slide from side to side on the bracket.

Run the belt over the new alternator pulley.

Install the new belt or put the old belt back through all the appropriate pulleys. If you’re not sure how to route the belt correctly, look for a diagram on the car body inside the engine compartment for guidance.

The strap will have to go around any specific accessories that it is supposed to power on your vehicle.

  • If there isn’t a diagram stuck in the engine bay, you might as well be able to find it in the vehicle’s owner’s manual.
  • You can also find the diagram on the manufacturer’s website.

Apply tension to the alternator with a lever if necessary

If your vehicle does not have an automatic tensioner pulley, apply pressure to the alternator with a large screwdriver or pry bar until the belt is tight. Place the lever between the alternator and the engine and push the alternator out, away from the engine.

  • Be careful not to pinch or cut any wires with the screwdriver or pry bar.
  • You or a friend will have to keep pressing until the bolts are tight.

Tighten the screws and the strap

With tension on the belt applied through the alternator and pry bar, use the appropriate socket and ratchet to tighten the two mounting bolts the rest of the way. This will allow the alternator to maintain tension on the belt.

Make sure the belt has less than an inch of play back and forth once installed.

If the belt is a little loose, loosen the bolts and apply pressure again using the bar while tightening them.

Connect the power cable and monitor harness

Reconnect the wire harness and insert the bolt that secures the main power cable to the alternator in the same order that you removed it. They must be installed exactly the same as on the old alternator.

  • Make sure the main power cable is tight on the new alternator.
  • Listen for an audible “click” from the wiring harness to confirm that it is tight.

Reconnect the battery

Now that you know how to change an alternator, what you are left with is just making a few adjustments. With the new alternator in place, all that’s left for you to do is reconnect the negative cable to the battery. Making sure to tighten it down firmly so it doesn’t loosen as you drive.

  • If the battery is dead, you may need to replace or charge it.
  • If the vehicle is raised, remove the jack and lower it.

You can also read: How Do You Know If An Alternator Is Going Bad?

Leave a Comment