How To Troubleshoot A Starter Solenoid!

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Without the starter solenoid your car can’t go anywhere. However, the only job of a starter solenoid is to fulfill the circuit between the battery and the starter when the ignition key is turned. However, not all starters work perfectly as they should, and the solenoid may refuse to crank the engine, disengage the pinion gear, or keep the starter running. Read on and learn how to troubleshoot a starter solenoid.

Fortunately, even with very little knowledge of electricity, you can learn how to troubleshoot and eliminate faults in a bad starter solenoid.

Steps to Troubleshoot a Starter Solenoid

How to Troubleshoot a Starter Solenoid
How to Troubleshoot a Starter Solenoid

Get the skills to test starter and remote mount solenoids, to perform these tests, it is much better if you have someone to assist you.

  1. Verify that your vehicle’s battery is fully charged before beginning these tests.
  1. Put the lever in neutralor neutral if you are diagnosing a car with a standard transmission or park if you are diagnosing a car with an automatic transmission.
  1. Set the parking brake and be sure to stay away from moving engine parts while performing these tests.
  1. Disconnect the coil high tension wire from the distributor cap and connect it to ground using a small jumper wire.
  1. Ask your friend to turn the ignition key to start as long as you hear the starter solenoid click. If you can hear a solid click, go directly to step 9 if your solenoid is on; then skip to steps 10 and 11 if you have your remote mounted solenoid, also if you hear a faint click or repeated clicking sounds go to the next step.
  1. Disconnect the small control circuit wire at the solenoid terminal.. If you find two small cables, then you should disconnect the one with a noticeable “S“; if not, check the wiring diagram for the particular car to locate this wire.
  1. Connect a jumper cable to the positive terminal of the battery. As you bring the other end of the jumper wire into contact with the solenoid’s control circuit terminal, you should hear a solid click; If you hear no sound at all, or if you hear a faint or flickering sound, make sure the solenoid is properly grounded and that there is no corrosion or other substance preventing a good ground connection. Repeat the test. If you still don’t hear a solid click, replace the starter solenoid.
  1. Disconnect the small control circuit wire at the solenoid terminal.. Ask your friend to turn the key to start the car. With the help of a voltmeter, check the voltage on the control circuit wire, if the voltmeter reads 0 volts, then it means that there is an open in that part of the circuit that is not allowing the solenoid to operate the starter. Locate and fix the opening.
  1. Ask your assistant or friend to turn the key to start. Check if there is a voltage drop between the battery terminal of the solenoid and the starter motor belt, the voltage drop should not be more than 0.2 volts; if not, replace the solenoid. Make sure the battery cable is securely connected to the solenoid, remember this step is for a starter solenoid only.
  1. Disconnect the small control circuit wire at the solenoid terminal. With the multimeter, check the resistance between the control circuit terminal and the ground support of the solenoid, and you can see that the resistance is greater than 5 ohms, replace the solenoid. Remember, this step is only for remote mounted solenoids.

This way you can troubleshoot a starter solenoid correctly. Remember to follow these steps carefully and responsibly.

Items you will need

The items you are going to use are:

  • Two jumper cables, 1 to 2 feet long
  • multimeter

Without the starter solenoid your car can’t go anywhere. However, the only job of a starter solenoid is to fulfill the circuit between the battery and the starter when the ignition key is turned. However, not all starters work perfectly as they should, and the solenoid may refuse to crank the engine, disengage the pinion gear, or keep the starter running. Read on and learn how to troubleshoot a starter solenoid.

Fortunately, even with very little knowledge of electricity, you can learn how to troubleshoot and eliminate faults in a bad starter solenoid.

Steps to Troubleshoot a Starter Solenoid

How to Troubleshoot a Starter Solenoid
How to Troubleshoot a Starter Solenoid

Get the skills to test starter and remote mount solenoids, to perform these tests, it is much better if you have someone to assist you.

  1. Verify that your vehicle’s battery is fully charged before beginning these tests.
  1. Put the lever in neutralor neutral if you are diagnosing a car with a standard transmission or park if you are diagnosing a car with an automatic transmission.
  1. Set the parking brake and be sure to stay away from moving engine parts while performing these tests.
  1. Disconnect the coil high tension wire from the distributor cap and connect it to ground using a small jumper wire.
  1. Ask your friend to turn the ignition key to start as long as you hear the starter solenoid click. If you can hear a solid click, go directly to step 9 if your solenoid is on; then skip to steps 10 and 11 if you have your remote mounted solenoid, also if you hear a faint click or repeated clicking sounds go to the next step.
  1. Disconnect the small control circuit wire at the solenoid terminal.. If you find two small cables, then you should disconnect the one with a noticeable “S“; if not, check the wiring diagram for the particular car to locate this wire.
  1. Connect a jumper cable to the positive terminal of the battery. As you bring the other end of the jumper wire into contact with the solenoid’s control circuit terminal, you should hear a solid click; If you hear no sound at all, or if you hear a faint or flickering sound, make sure the solenoid is properly grounded and that there is no corrosion or other substance preventing a good ground connection. Repeat the test. If you still don’t hear a solid click, replace the starter solenoid.
  1. Disconnect the small control circuit wire at the solenoid terminal.. Ask your friend to turn the key to start the car. With the help of a voltmeter, check the voltage on the control circuit wire, if the voltmeter reads 0 volts, then it means that there is an open in that part of the circuit that is not allowing the solenoid to operate the starter. Locate and fix the opening.
  1. Ask your assistant or friend to turn the key to start. Check if there is a voltage drop between the battery terminal of the solenoid and the starter motor belt, the voltage drop should not be more than 0.2 volts; if not, replace the solenoid. Make sure the battery cable is securely connected to the solenoid, remember this step is for a starter solenoid only.
  1. Disconnect the small control circuit wire at the solenoid terminal. With the multimeter, check the resistance between the control circuit terminal and the ground support of the solenoid, and you can see that the resistance is greater than 5 ohms, replace the solenoid. Remember, this step is only for remote mounted solenoids.

This way you can troubleshoot a starter solenoid correctly. Remember to follow these steps carefully and responsibly.

Items you will need

The items you are going to use are:

  • Two jumper cables, 1 to 2 feet long
  • multimeter

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