How To Fix The Symptoms Of A Bad Starter Solenoid!

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There is nothing more annoying than sitting in your car, turning the ignition key and hearing only a click or nothing at all. There could be a number of reasons for a no-start condition, and several of them can be quite simple or easy to fix. Keep reading and learn how to know and fix bad starter solenoid symptoms.

Among other reasons, the starter solenoid will need further investigation, since thanks to the starter solenoid which uses a high voltage magnetic relay to carry or transfer electricity from the ignition key to the starter, it could be the most likely cause of a problem. boot failure or problem.

How to Fix Bad Starter Solenoid Symptoms

Signs of a Bad or Damaged Starter Solenoid
Signs of a Bad or Damaged Starter Solenoid

To detect and solve the symptoms or signs of a damaged or defective starter solenoid, follow the following steps:

  1. Put the car in park or neutral with the emergency brake on. Leave the battery tethered for now and use a floor jack to raise the car high enough to put two jack stands under the front area of ​​the frame near each wheel. Then you need to jack up the rear of the car and put two jack stands under the rear area of ​​the frame very close to each wheel.
  1. Test the battery voltage with the help of a meter by putting the red positive lead of the voltmeter on the positive terminal of the battery.. Locate the black or negative wire on the negative terminal of the battery, then you will need to read at least 12.5 volts on the device. The key does not need to be on or in the start position to do this check, it charges the battery to full capacity if the reading is low.
  1. Go to the driver’s seat and turn the ignition key to the “on. Observe the brightness of the indicator lights on the dash. Turn the ignition key to the “” position.start” and see if the indicator lights go dark as you do so, if they go dark it means your ignition switch has made proper contact.
  1. Head over and go under the car with the voltmeter. Remove any hazard protection if it prevents access to the starter solenoid you will notice a very thick wire and a small paddle thrust wire you should select the small wire and in the case of a fuel injected engine you will notice only three wires: a thick one, a medium one (spade) and a smaller one, you should choose the medium size cable.
  1. Remove the medium (or small) wire and put the positive lead of the voltmeter between the wire pin. Place the negative probe of the voltmeter on a good ground source such as the frame. Have your assistant or friend turn the ignition key to the “start“. You would need to look at 12 volts on the wire, if this is not the case the wire needs to be checked from the solenoid site to the ignition key source for any tears or disconnection. Check that the fuse box does not have a damaged relay or starter fuse and replace it if required.
  1. Notice the two larger posts on the back of the starter solenoid.. The largest is the one that comes from the battery and is red, select the second largest position. Grab a jumper wire and connect the two posts momentarily, you will notice a spark arc, although this is normal. If the starter motor runs, it means the starter motor has been adjusted and is working properly.
  1. Look at the same two big poles you just jumped over. One of them has a thick braided wire running from it to the starter, put the positive meter lead on the braided wire and ground the negative meter lead against the starter frame or armature.
  1. Have your friend turn the key to the start position. You should hear a loud noise, right after hearing the starter and start the engine, as you should read 12 volts on the braided wire. If the starter doesn’t engage to crank the engine and you don’t read 12 volts on the positive wire, that means the solenoid has shorted and needs to be replaced.

Items you will need

The articles or things to use in this case are the following:

  • floor cat
  • cat stand
  • Battery charger (if applicable)
  • Voltmeter
  • Socket set (if applicable)
  • Jumper wire (thick)
  • Attendee

There is nothing more annoying than sitting in your car, turning the ignition key and hearing only a click or nothing at all. There could be a number of reasons for a no-start condition, and several of them can be quite simple or easy to fix. Keep reading and learn how to know and fix bad starter solenoid symptoms.

Among other reasons, the starter solenoid will need further investigation, since thanks to the starter solenoid which uses a high voltage magnetic relay to carry or transfer electricity from the ignition key to the starter, it could be the most likely cause of a problem. boot failure or problem.

How to Fix Bad Starter Solenoid Symptoms

Signs of a Bad or Damaged Starter Solenoid
Signs of a Bad or Damaged Starter Solenoid

To detect and solve the symptoms or signs of a damaged or defective starter solenoid, follow the following steps:

  1. Put the car in park or neutral with the emergency brake on. Leave the battery tethered for now and use a floor jack to raise the car high enough to put two jack stands under the front area of ​​the frame near each wheel. Then you need to jack up the rear of the car and put two jack stands under the rear area of ​​the frame very close to each wheel.
  1. Test the battery voltage with the help of a meter by putting the red positive lead of the voltmeter on the positive terminal of the battery.. Locate the black or negative wire on the negative terminal of the battery, then you will need to read at least 12.5 volts on the device. The key does not need to be on or in the start position to do this check, it charges the battery to full capacity if the reading is low.
  1. Go to the driver’s seat and turn the ignition key to the “on. Observe the brightness of the indicator lights on the dash. Turn the ignition key to the “” position.start” and see if the indicator lights go dark as you do so, if they go dark it means your ignition switch has made proper contact.
  1. Head over and go under the car with the voltmeter. Remove any hazard protection if it prevents access to the starter solenoid you will notice a very thick wire and a small paddle thrust wire you should select the small wire and in the case of a fuel injected engine you will notice only three wires: a thick one, a medium one (spade) and a smaller one, you should choose the medium size cable.
  1. Remove the medium (or small) wire and put the positive lead of the voltmeter between the wire pin. Place the negative probe of the voltmeter on a good ground source such as the frame. Have your assistant or friend turn the ignition key to the “start“. You would need to look at 12 volts on the wire, if this is not the case the wire needs to be checked from the solenoid site to the ignition key source for any tears or disconnection. Check that the fuse box does not have a damaged relay or starter fuse and replace it if required.
  1. Notice the two larger posts on the back of the starter solenoid.. The largest is the one that comes from the battery and is red, select the second largest position. Grab a jumper wire and connect the two posts momentarily, you will notice a spark arc, although this is normal. If the starter motor runs, it means the starter motor has been adjusted and is working properly.
  1. Look at the same two big poles you just jumped over. One of them has a thick braided wire running from it to the starter, put the positive meter lead on the braided wire and ground the negative meter lead against the starter frame or armature.
  1. Have your friend turn the key to the start position. You should hear a loud noise, right after hearing the starter and start the engine, as you should read 12 volts on the braided wire. If the starter doesn’t engage to crank the engine and you don’t read 12 volts on the positive wire, that means the solenoid has shorted and needs to be replaced.

Items you will need

The articles or things to use in this case are the following:

  • floor cat
  • cat stand
  • Battery charger (if applicable)
  • Voltmeter
  • Socket set (if applicable)
  • Jumper wire (thick)
  • Attendee

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