How To Change A Starter Solenoid: 3 Simple Steps!

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This time we will tell you how to change a starter solenoid of a vehicle. The starter solenoid transfers electricity to the starter motor from the battery when the key is turned in the ignition. If you’ve already had your starter solenoid tested and found it to be bad, you’ll need to replace it in order to start the vehicle again.

For further instructions on how to replace the starter solenoid on a specific vehicle, it is recommended that you read the service manual for the specific year, make, and model of your car.

How to change a starter solenoid

Sometimes your starter solenoid may stop working and after several tests you have come to the conclusion that the solution is to change it.

Replace Starter Solenoid
Replace Starter Solenoid

1.Raise the vehicle and find the starter

To replace the starter solenoid you must first prepare the car and locate it.

Park the car on a solid surface.

In order for you to access the starter on some vehicles, you will need to raise it. It is important that you find a solid surface that can support the weight of the car while it is supported by a jack and a jack stand.

  • Concrete and asphalt are the most ideal surfaces to lift a car.
  • Never ride a vehicle on grass, dirt, or gravel.

Disconnect the battery.

Before starting any project on your vehicle, you must disconnect the power supply to avoid electrical shock and ensure that you do not damage the electrical system. Use a hand wrench or socket to loosen the nut on the negative pole of the battery, then slide it off the terminal strip.

  • Lay the cable to one side of the battery so you can make sure it can’t come into contact with the terminal.
  • It is not necessary to disconnect the positive cable.

Raise the vehicle if necessary.

If you need to be under the car to access the starter, slide a scissor or cart jack under the vehicle at one of the designated jack spots. Raise the car by lifting and pressing or turning the handle until it is high enough for you to work under.

  • If you’re not sure where the designated connection points are for your vehicle, check your owner’s manual.
  • Be careful not to jack up the car in an area that cannot support the weight of the vehicle or that could damage the frame.

Place the jack stands under the vehicle.

Never work under a vehicle that is supported solely by a jack. The sliding jack stands under the vehicle at designated jacking points. Slowly lower the vehicle onto the jack stands to make sure the car is stable and the feet are in the correct position.

  • The support stands do not allow the vehicle to lower below the height set on the stand.
  • Hydraulic jacks can allow the car to lower at an unpredictable rate without jack stands to support the vehicle.

Locate the starter.

The starter solenoid is connected to the starter or starter motor most of the time. The starter is a cylindrical component that typically mounts to the side of the transmission bell housing where the transmission and engine meet.

  • If you can’t locate the starter, consult your car’s service manual for more information.
  • If your car’s starter solenoid is not connected to the starter, use your vehicle’s service manual to locate it.

2. How to remove the starter solenoid

It’s time you knew how to get the starter solenoid out so it can be changed.

Mark the wires on the starter.

The smaller cylinder connected to the starter motor is the starter solenoid.. On most solenoids, there are three wires connected to the terminals. Use pieces of masking tape to mark each wire with its corresponding terminal. One wire will be above, or further from the starter, another below, or closer, and the last will be a pigtail that can only be connected in one place.

  • Marking the wires before you disconnect them will allow you to easily determine which wire connects where on the new solenoid.
  • If your solenoid has four wires, be sure to mark the fourth accordingly.

Disconnect the wiring from the starter.

With the wires clearly marked, disconnect each one from the solenoid.. The pigtail can be disconnected by depressing the release clip and pulling back on the plastic harness. Don’t pull on the wiring itself, as it could become dislodged from the plastic harness. The other two are often held in place with a screw.

  • If you have to remove hardware to disconnect cables, store them in a safe place.

Remove the starter mounting bolts if necessary.

On some cars, you won’t be able to access the solenoid fasteners without removing the starter itself. On these applications, use a wrench to remove the two bolts that secure the starter to the bell housing. Then slide the starter off the engine.

  • If you can easily access the solenoid without removing the starter, there is no need to remove it..
  • Be sure to keep the bolts you remove in a safe place to reuse when you put the starter back on.

Unscrew or unscrew the starter motor solenoid.

The starter solenoid is normally held in place by two bolts. In some applications they may be bolted instead. Use the appropriate hand tool to remove the fasteners that secure the solenoid to the starter..

  • You may need to spray the fasteners with a rust remover like WD40 to loosen them.
  • Be careful not to break the bolts when you remove them.

Pull the solenoid away from the starter.

With the fasteners removed, grasp the solenoid firmly with one hand and slide it away from the starter and off. If the starter is still on the vehicle, this will be easier to do, but if you need to remove it, use your other hand to hold the starter while you separate the two components.

  • The solenoid will jump when you apply enough force.
  • Make sure the fasteners are removed before pulling on the solenoid, otherwise it won’t come loose.

3. Installation of the new solenoid

To finish the process and you can change the starter solenoid effectively, what remains is to place the new equipment.

Compare the new solenoid to the old one.

While it’s always important to compare new parts to old to make sure they fit, it’s particularly important with the starter solenoid. The solenoid on your vehicle may have come with three terminals, while the replacement will likely come with four. If your factory solenoid came with only three terminals, connect the third wire to the terminal marked “S” and does not use the other.

  • The terminal marked with the letter “I” is used only for vehicles that have four wires going to their starter solenoid.
  • If your car came with three wires, a four-terminal solenoid will work as long as you connect the wires the right way.

Put the new solenoid on the starter.

Locate the new solenoid on the starter by sliding it into the housing where you removed the old solenoid. You may need to apply a little pressure to pop the plunger into the starter housing.

  • Be careful not to press the solenoid at an angle.

Insert the bolts or screws to secure the solenoid.

Take the screws or bolts you removed from the old solenoid and insert them into the new one. Hand tighten them until the solenoid is secure and will not loosen.

  • If the screws were damaged during removal, replace them with identical fasteners at your local hardware or auto parts store.

Reinstall the starter if necessary.

If you had to remove the starter motor to access the solenoid fasteners, put it back in the vehicle. Use the bolts you previously removed to secure the starter in place.

  • You may want to test your starter at a local auto parts store before reinstalling it to make sure there are no problems.
  • Be careful not to let any debris fall into the hole as you put the starter back in place.

Connect the wiring.

Use the labels you placed on the wires to guide you as you connect the wiring to the new solenoid. The top and bottom wires will go in the exact same places as on the old solenoid. If your replacement solenoid has four terminals and has three wires, connect the third wire to the terminal marked “S“.

  • Once connected, reconnect the battery and try to start the car.
  • Make sure the battery has a full charge or the starter motor will not start.

This time we will tell you how to change a starter solenoid of a vehicle. The starter solenoid transfers electricity to the starter motor from the battery when the key is turned in the ignition. If you’ve already had your starter solenoid tested and found it to be bad, you’ll need to replace it in order to start the vehicle again.

For further instructions on how to replace the starter solenoid on a specific vehicle, it is recommended that you read the service manual for the specific year, make, and model of your car.

How to change a starter solenoid

Sometimes your starter solenoid may stop working and after several tests you have come to the conclusion that the solution is to change it.

Replace Starter Solenoid
Replace Starter Solenoid

1.Raise the vehicle and find the starter

To replace the starter solenoid you must first prepare the car and locate it.

Park the car on a solid surface.

In order for you to access the starter on some vehicles, you will need to raise it. It is important that you find a solid surface that can support the weight of the car while it is supported by a jack and a jack stand.

  • Concrete and asphalt are the most ideal surfaces to lift a car.
  • Never ride a vehicle on grass, dirt, or gravel.

Disconnect the battery.

Before starting any project on your vehicle, you must disconnect the power supply to avoid electrical shock and ensure that you do not damage the electrical system. Use a hand wrench or socket to loosen the nut on the negative pole of the battery, then slide it off the terminal strip.

  • Lay the cable to one side of the battery so you can make sure it can’t come into contact with the terminal.
  • It is not necessary to disconnect the positive cable.

Raise the vehicle if necessary.

If you need to be under the car to access the starter, slide a scissor or cart jack under the vehicle at one of the designated jack spots. Raise the car by lifting and pressing or turning the handle until it is high enough for you to work under.

  • If you’re not sure where the designated connection points are for your vehicle, check your owner’s manual.
  • Be careful not to jack up the car in an area that cannot support the weight of the vehicle or that could damage the frame.

Place the jack stands under the vehicle.

Never work under a vehicle that is supported solely by a jack. The sliding jack stands under the vehicle at designated jacking points. Slowly lower the vehicle onto the jack stands to make sure the car is stable and the feet are in the correct position.

  • The support stands do not allow the vehicle to lower below the height set on the stand.
  • Hydraulic jacks can allow the car to lower at an unpredictable rate without jack stands to support the vehicle.

Locate the starter.

The starter solenoid is connected to the starter or starter motor most of the time. The starter is a cylindrical component that typically mounts to the side of the transmission bell housing where the transmission and engine meet.

  • If you can’t locate the starter, consult your car’s service manual for more information.
  • If your car’s starter solenoid is not connected to the starter, use your vehicle’s service manual to locate it.

2. How to remove the starter solenoid

It’s time you knew how to get the starter solenoid out so it can be changed.

Mark the wires on the starter.

The smaller cylinder connected to the starter motor is the starter solenoid.. On most solenoids, there are three wires connected to the terminals. Use pieces of masking tape to mark each wire with its corresponding terminal. One wire will be above, or further from the starter, another below, or closer, and the last will be a pigtail that can only be connected in one place.

  • Marking the wires before you disconnect them will allow you to easily determine which wire connects where on the new solenoid.
  • If your solenoid has four wires, be sure to mark the fourth accordingly.

Disconnect the wiring from the starter.

With the wires clearly marked, disconnect each one from the solenoid.. The pigtail can be disconnected by depressing the release clip and pulling back on the plastic harness. Don’t pull on the wiring itself, as it could become dislodged from the plastic harness. The other two are often held in place with a screw.

  • If you have to remove hardware to disconnect cables, store them in a safe place.

Remove the starter mounting bolts if necessary.

On some cars, you won’t be able to access the solenoid fasteners without removing the starter itself. On these applications, use a wrench to remove the two bolts that secure the starter to the bell housing. Then slide the starter off the engine.

  • If you can easily access the solenoid without removing the starter, there is no need to remove it..
  • Be sure to keep the bolts you remove in a safe place to reuse when you put the starter back on.

Unscrew or unscrew the starter motor solenoid.

The starter solenoid is normally held in place by two bolts. In some applications they may be bolted instead. Use the appropriate hand tool to remove the fasteners that secure the solenoid to the starter..

  • You may need to spray the fasteners with a rust remover like WD40 to loosen them.
  • Be careful not to break the bolts when you remove them.

Pull the solenoid away from the starter.

With the fasteners removed, grasp the solenoid firmly with one hand and slide it away from the starter and off. If the starter is still on the vehicle, this will be easier to do, but if you need to remove it, use your other hand to hold the starter while you separate the two components.

  • The solenoid will jump when you apply enough force.
  • Make sure the fasteners are removed before pulling on the solenoid, otherwise it won’t come loose.

3. Installation of the new solenoid

To finish the process and you can change the starter solenoid effectively, what remains is to place the new equipment.

Compare the new solenoid to the old one.

While it’s always important to compare new parts to old to make sure they fit, it’s particularly important with the starter solenoid. The solenoid on your vehicle may have come with three terminals, while the replacement will likely come with four. If your factory solenoid came with only three terminals, connect the third wire to the terminal marked “S” and does not use the other.

  • The terminal marked with the letter “I” is used only for vehicles that have four wires going to their starter solenoid.
  • If your car came with three wires, a four-terminal solenoid will work as long as you connect the wires the right way.

Put the new solenoid on the starter.

Locate the new solenoid on the starter by sliding it into the housing where you removed the old solenoid. You may need to apply a little pressure to pop the plunger into the starter housing.

  • Be careful not to press the solenoid at an angle.

Insert the bolts or screws to secure the solenoid.

Take the screws or bolts you removed from the old solenoid and insert them into the new one. Hand tighten them until the solenoid is secure and will not loosen.

  • If the screws were damaged during removal, replace them with identical fasteners at your local hardware or auto parts store.

Reinstall the starter if necessary.

If you had to remove the starter motor to access the solenoid fasteners, put it back in the vehicle. Use the bolts you previously removed to secure the starter in place.

  • You may want to test your starter at a local auto parts store before reinstalling it to make sure there are no problems.
  • Be careful not to let any debris fall into the hole as you put the starter back in place.

Connect the wiring.

Use the labels you placed on the wires to guide you as you connect the wiring to the new solenoid. The top and bottom wires will go in the exact same places as on the old solenoid. If your replacement solenoid has four terminals and has three wires, connect the third wire to the terminal marked “S“.

  • Once connected, reconnect the battery and try to start the car.
  • Make sure the battery has a full charge or the starter motor will not start.

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